News

September 2021

I have presented ongoing research on the construction of European security databases at the German Political Science Association (DVPW) Congress.

I am happy to announce that I have been elected as co-convenor of the critical security studies section at the German Political Science Association (DVPW). I am looking forward to working with Andrea Schneiker, Susanne Fischer and Hendrik Hegemann and to strengthening the German-speaking community during my three-year term.

I have presented ongoing research on the Schengen Information System and on Passenger Name Record data at the European International Studies Association’s (EISA) Pan-European Conference.

At the conference, I am also co-convener of the “Science, Technology and Security” section that hosts a total of five panels that explore the entanglement of technology and international politics.

August 2021

I have discussed results from our predictive policing research project at a workshop on predictive analytics, organized by the University of Twente. The event took place online.

My latest book chapter, co-authored with Mareile Kaufmann, has now been published in a new book that investigates automation in different security-related domains. (Link)

In our contribution, based on empirical research on predictive policing, we describe and theorize the life cycle of crime data and explicate how the dynamic characteristics of data come to matter in the production of crime forecasts.

July 2021

I am very happy that our Special Issue in Geopolitics is now fully online. The introduction, entitled “Data Matters: The Politics and Practices of Digital Border and Migration Management” is open access and can be read/downloaded here: (Link)

The contributions to the Special Issue that I guest-edited together with Simon Noori and Stephan Scheel investigate how data collection and analytics are profoundly transforming the ways in which migration and security are regulated today. In doing so, they draw on a number of empirical cases from Europe and beyond.

Nina Klimburg-Witjes and I have convened a two-day workshop on research ethics and methodology. The final program can be found here: (Link)

The event was part of the European Workshop in International Studies (EWIS), facilitated by the European International Studies Association (EISA). Due to COVID-19 restrictions, all 2021 EWIS events took place fully virtual.

June 2021

My latest article has now been published in the German-speaking Zeitschrift für Internationale Beziehungen (Link).

In the article, entitled “Die Sache mit der Technologie: Zur Neuordnung eines analytischen Bereichs in den Internationalen Beziehungen” (The issue with technology: on the re-organization of an analytical field of international relations), I explore how the study of technology from an International Relations perspective has resulted in a theoretical and conceptual turn towards the sociology of science and technology as well as in a methodological turn towards qualitative field research.

I am very happy that our book “Criminal Futures” has been drawing positive reviews by Kira Vrist Rønn in the Journal of Extreme Anthropology (Link) and Claudio Altenhain at surveillancestudies.org (Link).

May 2021

From June to August 2021, I will be hosting two student interns from the “International Master in Security, Intelligence and Strategic Studies” program. The program is a collaboration between the University of Glasgow, Dublin City University, Charles University Prague, and the University of Trento. Both interns will contribute to research into the genealogy of European security and migration databases.

April 2021

Simon Egbert and I discussed our book “Criminal Futures” at Cornell University’s Peace and Conflict Studies Reading Group.

Simon Egbert and I were invited to discuss our recently published book “Criminal Futures: Predictive Policing and Everyday Police Work” at the Algorithmic Governance Research Group’s Black Box Podcast. The full episode can be accessed here: (Link).

March 2021

My articles in Social Studies of Science (Link, open access) and the Swiss Political Science Review (Link) have now been published in print.

I am very happy to join the editorial board of the Central European Journal of International and Security Studies (CEJISS). The journal, published by the Metropolitan University Prague and committed to full Open Access, will throughout 2021 undergo a strategic relaunch under new editorial leadership. (Link)

February 2021

I have presented ongoing research on the Schengen Information System at the annual conference of the Swiss Political Science Association (SPSA). This year’s conference took place digitally.

My latest article has been published as online first version in the Swiss Political Science Review (SPSR). In the article, I argue why predictive policing is best understood as a practice that is coined by technical as much as by social aspects. (Link)

The article will be part of a forthcoming special debate section on technology and security, facilitated by Myriam Dunn Cavelty and Jonas Hagmann.

The final program for the International Political Sociogy (IPS) Working Group at the Swiss Political Science Association (SPSA) conference 2021 is now available (link).

Anna Leander, Klaus Dingwerth, and I are very happy about the large number of participants for the section. We are particularly thankful that Charlotte Heath-Kelly and Siba Grovogui have agreed to facilitate two additional workshops for participants. The conference will take place digitally on 4-5 February.

January 2021

I have presented ongoing research on the Schengen Information System at an online workshop organized by the STS-MIGTEC network.

I have contributed to a Deutschlandfunk radio feature on the securitization of migration in the EU.

The feature can be accessed as audio and text here (in German): (Link)

December 2020

I have published a policy paper that summarizes the main findings from our book “Criminal Futures: Predictive Policing and Everyday Work”. The paper, part of the Center for Security Studies’ “Policy Perspectives” series, argues that while data-driven analytics can increase the effectiveness and efficiency of police work, police departments should proceed with care, as tools such as predictive policing raise a number of concerns regarding human rights and civil liberties.

The English version of the paper can be found here (Link) and the German version is available here (Link).

I am very happy that our book from the research project on predictive policing has now been published. The monograph, co-authored with Simon Egbert, explores how predictive policing transforms police work. Based on three years of field research in Germany and Switzerland, it provides a theoretically sophisticated and empirically detailed account of how the police produce and act upon criminal futures as part of their everyday work practices.

Thanks to generous funding from ETH Zurich and TU Berlin, the book is available as Open Access eBook version that can be downloaded for free here: (Link)

I have participated in an expert workshop on biometrics and interoperable law enforcement and border control databases in Europe. The online event, convened by statewatch, brought together academics, journalists, and representatives of NGOs to discuss the challenges that current developments present and how to address them.

Anna Leander, Klaus Dingwerth and I have finalized the preliminary program for the 2021 Swiss Political Science Association (SPSA) conference. The conference will be held virtually on 3-4 February 2021.

We are very happy to convene not only contributions by Swiss colleagues, but also from a broad range of international guests. Moreover, we will be able to offer two additional workshops, convened by Charlotte Heath-Kelly and Siba Grovogui. The program can be found here: (Link)

November 2020

As part of a theme week on artificial intelligence convened by University of Zurich’s Digital Society Initiative, I have given a public keynote lecture on predictive policing. In the lecture, I have summarized the main findings from our forthcoming book Criminal futures: Predictive policing and everyday police work. It was followed by a panel discussion with journalist Adrienne Fichter of “Republik” and Dominik Balogh of the Zurich municipal police department.

A recording of the event (in German) can be found here: (Link)

I have presented ongoing research on the Schengen Information System at the workshop “Making Europe through Infrastructures of (In)Security”. The workshop, originally set to take place in Vienna, was held online.

October 2020

I have been teaching an online workshop on AI in policing and law enforcement for fellows of the Friedrich Ebert Foundation.

Two more reviews of the “Technology and Agency in International Relations” book that I co-edited with Marijn Hoijtink in 2019 have been published.

The first one has been written by Bruno Maciel Santos at E-International Relations (Link), and the second one by Neil Wilson of the “Intimacies of Remote Warfare” Team at the University of Utrecht (Link).

I am very happy about our colleagues’ thorough engagement with our work.

I am very happy that my latest article has now been published in Geopolitics as online first version. (Link)

In the article, I analyze the political and conceptual driving forces behind the interoperability of border and migration databases in the EU. I argue that we are currently witnessing a shift from traditional identity production at border sites towards a digital space of identity management.

Our 2019 book on “Technology and Agency in International Relations”, co-edited with Marijn Hoijtink, has been reviewed by Chantal Lavallée in the Revue Française de Science Politique. The article (in French) can be found here: (Link)

At the conference of the German Political Science Association’s (DVPW) International Relations section, I have presented new research on the evolution of the Schengen Information System.

Due to the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, the conference – originally supposed to take place in Freiburg – was held in a fully digital setting.

September 2020

I am very happy that my latest article, co-authored with Sam Weiss Evans and Dagmar Rychnovská, has now been published as online first version in Social Studies of Science. (Link)

In the paper, we explore modes of socio-technical collaboration with security communities of practice. Bringing together literatures from STS and critical security studies, we then identify several key challenges to critical social engagement of social scientists in security-related issues.

Thanks to generous funding from the European Commission, the article is available as open access.

August 2020

I gave a brief interview on predictive policing to digitization news portal meinungsbarometer.info. The interview (in German) can be found here: (Link).

Together with Sam Weiss Evans and Dagmar Rychnovská, I have presented research on engagement with security communities of practice at the joint conference of the European Association for the Study of Science and Technology (EASST) and the Society for Social Studies of Science (4S).

The paper, based on our 2019 workshop in Krakow, was shortly before the conference accepted for publication in Social Studies of Science and will be available online soon.

The conference, originally supposed to take place in Prague, had been moved to a fully virtual setting due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

I have conducted an analysis of Swiss crisis management with regard to COVID-19. It has been published as part of the Center for Security Studies’ “Policy Perspectives” series. (Link)

July 2020

Our book manuscript from the predictive policing project has now officially been moved to production. The book will be entitled “Criminal Futures: Predictive Policing and Everyday Police Work” and is set to be published by Routledge in October 2020. (Link)

June 2020

I am happy to be part of an expert group that, on behalf of the Federal Ministry of the Interior, has discussed recommendations for the new AI strategy for German police organizations.

The strategy will pay specific attention to the ethical and societal challenges that can arise from the use of machine learning applications in crime prevention and law enforcement.

A new book chapter entitled “‘We do that once per day’: Cyclical Futures and Institutional Ponderousness in Predictive Policing” has been published as part of the edited collection “The Politics and Science of Prevision”.

In the chapter, I explore temporal aspects of predictive policing and show how algorithmically constructed futures take shape in close correspondence with the rhythms of crime and police work.

The entire book is available as open access here.

May 2020

In light of the COVID-19 global pandemic, most academic meetings, conferences, and other events throughout 2020 have been cancelled. While this is unfortunate, it is a small price to pay for the sake of global health.

It does however directly affect the “Researching Security Communities of Practice” workshop that Nina Klimburg-Witjes and I had organized as part of EWIS in Brussels, as well as the “Science, Technology and Security” section that Dagmar Rychnovská and I were set to convene for the EISA-PEC conference in Malta.

The workshop will instead take place as part of EWIS 2021, to be held in Thessaloniki. EISA-PEC in Malta has been postponed to 2021.

February 2020

I am honored that Mareile Kaufmann, Simon Egbert and I have been awarded the 2019 Radzinowicz Prize for our article “Predictive policing and the politics of patterns” (British Journal of Criminology 59(3): 674-692, available as open access).

The Radzinowicz Prize is awarded annually to the BJC article that has made the greatest contribution to knowledge of criminal justice issues and the development of criminology. (Link)

The preliminary program for our workshop “Researching Security Communities of Practice: Ethical Concerns, Challenges and Coping Strategies” is now available. (Link)

The workshop, convened by Nina Klimburg-Witjes and me, will take place in Brussels, 1-4 July 2020 as part of EISA’s European Workshops in International Studies (EWIS) series. (Link to the EWIS website)

I have contributed a chapter to a new German book on Predictive Policing. In the chapter, I argue that predictive policing does not automatically contribute to an alleged increase of efficiency. Rather, it is important to pay close attention to larger socio-technical aspects of police work in order not to undercut the potential of predictive policing tools.

I have presented research on digital borders and on cyber security marketing (with Myriam Dunn Cavelty) at the Swiss Political Science Association (SPSA) conference in Lucerne.

January 2020

I was invited to give a keynote lecture at the workshop “The Mobility-Security Nexus and the Reconstruction/Emergence of (Trans)National Order”, University of Marburg.

I have presented and discussed a first draft from the ‘Studying security’ project at the Institute of Sociology research colloquium, University of Freiburg.

We have now finalized the program for the International Political Sociology (IPS) section at this year’s Swiss Political Science Association (SPSA) conference in Lucerne.

In addition to the regular panels, we are very happy to include two keynote lectures by Vivienne Jabri and Laura Sjoberg. The program can be found here: (Link)

My introductory essay on migration and security (in German) has been published online by the Bundeszentrale für politische Bildung (Federal Agency for Civic Education).

The essay draws attention to the ways in which strategies for governing cross-border mobility and political discourse around forced migration often become conflated and reinforce a presupposed link between migration and security. (Link)

For the next three years, Dagmar Rychnovská and I will convene a semi-standing section on “Science, Technology and Security” at EISA’s annual Pan-European Conference on International Relations.

Starting with this year’s conference in Malta, we look forward to facilitating in-depth conversations about the role of science and technology in international politics.

December 2019

Thanks to generous funding from the University of Oslo, our 2019 article “Predictive Policing and the Politics of Patterns” in the British Journal of Criminology is now available as open access. (Link)

Rahel Kunz, Anna Leander and I have finalized the preliminary program for the International Political Sociology (IPS) section at the Swiss Political Science Association (SPSA) conference 2020. The conference will take place in Lucerne, 3-4 February. The program can be found here.

I have presented a paper on predictive policing and automation at a workshop on security practices and security technologies at Marburg, facilitated by the critical security studies section of the German Political Science Association (DVPW).

November 2019

Nina Klimburg-Witjes and I will convene a workshop on how to do research with/on security communities of practices. The workshop will be part of the European Workshops in International Studies (EWIS), Brussels, 1-4 July 2020. The Call for Papers can be found here.

I have been featured as expert on predictive policing in the latest episode of science TV show “Planet Wissen”. The full episode (in German) is available here.

October 2019

At a workshop on “Fabricating World Politics”, part of EISA’s exploratory symposia in Rapallo, I have discussed our current book project on predictive policing.

As part of the “Podium Interface” lecture series at Fachhochschule Nordwestschweiz (FHNW), I have given a public talk on predictive policing in Switzerland.

I have given a guest lecture on predictive policing in the seminar “Law and Tech” at ETH Zurich.

September 2019

I have given a lecture on the implementation of predictive policing software at the Swiss Smart Government Day, St. Gallen.

At the EISA Pan-European Conference in Sofia, I have presented three papers on identity management, security markets, and engagement with communities of practice.

June 2019

As part of our EWIS workshop on “Global Reconfigurations of Science, Technology, and Security” in Krakow, Sam Weiss Evans, Dagmar Rychnovská and I have presented the draft of a co-authored paper on critical engagement with techno-scientific communities.

I have spoken about digital technologies and borders at a workshop at University of Nottingham’s Human Rights Law Centre.

I have presented findings from the predictive policing project to the crime analysis division of the cantonal police Basel-Stadt.

May 2019

I have presented preliminary findings from the predictive policing project at an expert workshop convened by Amnesty International in Amsterdam.

The preliminary program for our workshop on “Global reconfigurations of science, technology, and security” is now available. The workshop will take place in Kraków on 27 & 28 June, as part of the European Workshops in International Studies (EWIS). (Link)

I have presented insights from the predictive policing project at a workshop on technology and politics in Geneva.

April 2019

I have presented work on the EU security research program to a delegation from the National Defense University (NDU) Washington.

Our article on “Predictive Policing and the Politics of Patterns” in the British Journal of Criminology has now appeared in print in Volume 59, Issue 3. (Link)

The program for the “Data matters: Digital technologies and the politics of bordering” workshop has now been finalized. The event will take place at University of Zurich/ETH Zurich on 23 & 24 May. (Link)

March 2019

Our article “Putting critique to work: Ethics in EU security research” has been featured on the Security Dialogue blog. (Link)

I have presented papers on digital borders and predictive policing at the International Studies Association (ISA) Annual Convention in Toronto.

February 2019

My latest article, co-authored with Myriam Dunn Cavelty, has been published in the European Review of International Studies.

In the article, we analyze how security becomes a contested public issue with regard to CCTV systems and cyberspace. It is part of a special issue on politicization, guest-edited by Jonas Hagmann, Hendrik Hegemann and Andrew Neal. The entire issue can be found here: (Link)

I have presented ongoing research from the predictive policing project at the Swiss Political Science Association’s (SPSA) Annual Conference.

Our article “Putting critique to work: Ethics in EU Security Research”, co-authored with Kristoffer Lidén and Blagovesta Nikolova, has now been published in print.

The paper is part of the Security Dialogue 50th anniversary special issue on “Doing and mediating critique”, guest-edited by John Austin, Rocco Bellanova and Mareile Kaufmann. The entire issue can be accessed here: (Link)

December 2018

Our study on “Security Measures at Zurich Airport” has been referenced in an article in the Neue Zürcher Zeitung (NZZ). (Link to the study) (Link to the article)

Our first article from the predictive policing project, entitled “Predictive policing and the politics of patterns”, has now been published as online first version in the British Journal of Criminology.

In the paper, Mareile Kaufmann, Simon Egbert and I explore the role and epistemic status of pattern identification in different approaches to predictive policing. (Link)

My article “Between a carrot and a stick: Science diplomacy and access to EU research funding” in Global Policy has now appeared in print. It is part of an excellent special issue on “Science Diplomacy”, guest-edited by Carolin Kaltofen, Michele Acuto and Jason Blackstock. The entire issue can be accessed here: (Link)

November 2018

Together with Dagmar Rychnovská and Sam Weiss Evans, I am organizing a workshop on “Global reconfigurations of science, technology, and security”. The workshop will take place in Kraków in June of 2019, as part of the EISA’s European Workshops in International Studies (EWIS).

All information, including the Call for Papers, can be found here: (Link)

My latest article, co-authored with Kristoffer Lidén and Blagovesta Nikolova, has been published in Security Dialogue as online first version. In the paper, entitled “Putting Critique to Work: Ethics in EU Security Research”, we engage the relationship between critique and ethics vis-à-vis the European Union’s funding framework for security research. (Link)

The 2018 edition of the CSS Bulletin on Swiss Security Policy has been published. I have contributed a chapter on predictive policing in Switzerland. The entire volume can be downloaded here: (Link)

October 2018

Together with Simon Noori and Stephan Scheel, I am organizing a workshop on digital technologies and the politics of bordering. The event will take place in Zurich in May 2019. The Call for Papers can be found here: (Link)

My 2017 article “Prevention, Knowledge, Justice: Robert Nozick and Counterterrorism” in Critical Terrorism Studies has been re-published as part of the collection “Critical Terrorism Studies at Ten: Contributions, Cases and Future Challenges”, edited by Richard Jackson, Harmonie Toros, Lee Jarvis and Charlotte Heath-Kelly. (Link)

September 2018

At the European International Studies Association (EISA) conference in Prague, I have presented ongoing work on (1) predictive policing, (2) critical security studies and critique, and (3) research ethics.

July 2018

Together with Simon Egbert, I have organized two panels on predictive policing at the European Association for the Study of Science and Technology (EASST) conference in Leicester. I have also presented a paper from my own research on predictive policing.

I was invited to give a keynote lecture on technology and the EU border framework at the workshop “Surveillance, Terrorism, Normality” in Tuebingen.

As part of that trip, I also gave a guest-lecture on security culture and security markets in the seminar “Security in Times of Modern Information Technologies” at the University of Tuebingen.

I have presented ongoing research on technology and border management at the Association of Borderland Studies (ABS) conference in Vienna.

My guest-contribution to “sicherheitspolitik-blog.de”, a German blog on security politics, has been published. In my post, entitled “Europe’s new digital borders”, I analyze implications of new technologies for border management. (Link)

June 2018

I have presented work on predictive policing at the British International Studies Association (BISA) conference in Bath.

I have participated in the workshop “New Technologies of Warfare: Implications of Autonomous Weapons Systems for IR” at the European Workshops in International Studies (EWIS) in Groningen with a paper on human-machine interaction.

May 2018

Two encyclopedia entries on “Passenger Profiling” and “Airport Terminal Security Screenings”, both co-authored with Michael Nagenborg, have been published as part of the “SAGE Encyclopedia of Surveillance, Security, and Privacy”. (Link)

April 2018

Together with Mareile Kaufmann, I have presented research on predictive policing at the workshop “Automated Justice: Algorithms, Big Data and Criminal Justice Systems” in Zurich.

My article “Between a Carrot and a Stick: Science Diplomacy and Access to EU Research Funding” has been published as online-first version in Global Policy. The paper analyzes the dispute between Switzerland and the EU on the freedom of movement, and how access to Horizon 2020 was in this conflict mobilized as political leverage by the European Commission. (Link)

The print version of the article will be part of a special issue on science diplomacy, guest-edited by Carolin Kaltofen, Michele Acuto and Jason Blackstock.

I have given a guest-lecture on predictive policing in the seminar “Big Data, Law & Policy” at ETH Zurich.

February 2018

Our special issue on “The new mobilities paradigm and critical security studies”, co-edited together with Stef Wittendorp, has been published in Mobilities Vol. 13, No. 2.

In addition to excellent work from George Glouftsios; Johannes Kester; Audrey Reeves; Pete Forman; Samid Suliman; and Jana Hönke & Ivan Cuesta-Fernández, the issue also contains an article by myself, entitled “Standardizing Security: The Business Case Politics of Borders”, in which I explore biometrics and automated border control in the EU.

The entire issue can be accessed here: (Link)

I have presented ongoing research on borders and technology at the Swiss Political Science Association (SPSA) conference in Geneva.